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Publications—Revelation
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Essays on Revelation: Appropriating Yesterday’s Apocalypse in Today’s World
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Essays on Revelation: Appropriating Yesterday’s Apocalypse in Today’s World (Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2011) is a volume of twelve essays on interpreting the book of Revelation. The book of Revelation perennially provokes outlandish futurist predictions proven patently false over time. Such prophecy failures leave the impression that the book of Revelation is nothing but a hoax, safely ignored and without contemporary relevance. The inevitable result for both church members and ministers is a canonical book stripped bare of canonical authority. In this volume, six contributors collectively provide a path toward recanonizing Revelation, reclaiming its authority and relevance through christological foundations. The book not only is useful in the collegiate and seminary classroom, but also for serious small-group Bible studies wanting something deeper than a fear of being “left behind.” Each essay poses “Questions for Reflection” that bring the ancient text into the contemporary setting today.
Essays on Revelation: Appropriating Yesterday’s Apocalypse in Today’s World
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Contributors:
James Jeffrey Cate, PhD, Professor of Christian Studies, California Baptist University, Riverside, California
  • “The Text of Revelation: Why neither Armageddon no 666 May Be Exactly What You Think”
  • “How Green Was John’s World? Ecology and Revelation”
Renate Viveen Hood, PhD, Associate Prof. of Christian Studies, New Testament, Universtiy of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, Texas
  • “Women and Warriors: Character Development in John’s Apocalypse”
  • “Pure or Defiled? A Sociological Analysis of John’s Apocalypse”
Stephen N. Horn, PhD, First Baptist Church, Lafayette, Louisiana
  • “Let the One Who Has Ears: Hearing What the Spirit Says to the Church Today!”
  • “Hallelujah, the Lord our God, the Almighty Reigns: The Theology of the Hymns of Revelation”
Richard Warren Johnson, PhD, Professor of Religion, East Texas Baptist University, Marshall, Texas
  • “Urban Persons: City and Identity in the Book of Revelation”
  • “Confronting the Beast: The Imperial Cult and the Book of Revelation”
Sylvie T. Raquel, PhD, Assist. Prof. of New Testament and Greek, Trinity International University, Deerfield, Illinois
  • “Blessed Are the Peacemakers: The Theology of Peace in the Book of Revelation”
  • “Revelation as Drama: A Staging of the Apocalypse”
Gerald L. Stevens, PhD, Professor of New Testament and Greek, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • “A Vision in the Night: Setting the Interpretive Stage for John’s Apocalypse”
  • “One Like a Son of Man: Contemplating Christology in Rev. 1:9–20”
Revelation: The Past and Future of John’s Apocalypse
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Revelation: The Past and Future of John's Apocalypse (Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2014) is a three-part study covering the history of interpretation, theological foundations, and exegesis. Copious illustrations from the authors worldwide travels enhance discussion of Romes emperors, empire, and ideology as the premier horizon for understanding Johns immediate context and meaning. Distinctive contributions include Stevenss effort to re-canonize Revelation by insisting on gospel concord, methodically interpreting all of Revelation through the lens of the seven churches and showing how Revelations imagery consistently relates more to the incarnation than the Parousia. Stevens bypasses traditional millennial options to argue that Revelation is “passion-millennial—the passion of Jesus predicates the passion of the church. Under Stevenss hands, Revelation becomes eminently sensible to the original audience and powerfully pertinent for todays church.
Revelation: The Past and Future of John’s Apocalypse
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Recommendations:
R. Jackson Painter, Professor of New Testament, Simpson University, Redding, CA
“Audacious, entertaining, insightful, readable, brilliant in scope and execution, Gerald Stevenss Revelation will be the next textbook I use for my class on the book of Revelation. . . . Stevens shows that John simply is telling the gospel message in a different form for a new situation that speaks to Johns own audience and ours today.

David A. deSilva, Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek, Ashland Theological Seminary, Cleveland, OH

“Stevens has written a guidebook to Revelation and its interpretation that is both compendious and highly accessible. . . . Hundreds of well-chosen photographs and illustrations help the world of Roman Asia Minor and of Revelation itself come alive. We are indebted to Stevens for opening up his classroom to all of us.

Bruce Chilton, Bernard Iddings Bell Professor of Religion, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

“Gerald L. Stevens brings an exacting, pedagogical focus to three related issues: (1) the historical and literary context of the Revelation to John, (2) the history of its reception (especially in modern America), and (3) the enduring value of Johns visions. In treating those questions, he has developed a subtle and comprehensive defense of the place of the Apocalypse within a mature, Christian imagination—as well as a trenchant critique of dispensationalist claims.